Dionne Warwick – Dionne!

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A distinguished member of the Better Records Rock and Pop Hall of Fame

Compiling the strongest material from the first four albums — all produced by Burt Bacharach and Hal David — somehow, against all odds if you stop to think about it, this Columbia record club exclusive pressing ended up being mastered exceptionally well, obviously from superb tapes.

This Double Allbum 2-pack is the first of its kind here at Better Records. One copy we played had three amazingly good sides out of four, with a very weak fourth side, and another copy had three no-better-than-decent sides with a shootout winning White Hot side 4. Together the four LPs have the four best sides we have ever listed, with 2 White Hot sides and 2 Super Hot sides. You would need a VERY big stack of copies to find four sides with anything close to the sound of this set.

We’ve played more than our share of bad sounding Dionne Warwick compilations over the course of the last thirty years, so imagine our surprise when so many tracks here were competitive with the best originals we’ve heard.

Which means that the future owner of these records will get to hear classics such as Anyone Who Had a Heart; Don’t Make Me Over ; Wishin’ and Hopin’; and Make It Easy on Yourself, not to mention the nineteen other songs on the album, all of them with SUPERB SOUND.

Of course the pressings we played were all over the map; they always are. You know right away if you’ve got a bad one on the table: The voices get screechier as they get louder (somewhat of a problem on even the best copies), the overall image is small, flat and opaque; the midrange dark, veiled and smeary.

We are of course including all the bad sides so that you can hear how bad the average side really is. Side four of the first set and side three of the second set were two of the worst sides we heard in the entire shootout. They’re positively painful.

There’s plenty of Tubey Magic on these recordings. The good pressings show you a rich, breathy, unbelievably emotional Dionne Warwick. The bad ones dry up her vocals, smear away her breath and take the heartache right out of her voice.

Living and Breathing

Only the good copies (or to be more precise the good sides of the good copies) present us with a living, breathing Dionne, front and center, surrounded by background singers, session musicians and members of the orchestra, all playing together live in a huge studio space.

Which, of course, they probably aren’t, playing together in the same room that is. It sure sounds like they are though; credit must go to the producers and engineers for the creation of such a convincing illusion. It goes without saying that the better the stereo the more convincing it is.

Budget and poorly set up front ends will have difficulty reproducing the louder vocal parts on this album. (To be honest, we did too.) They are a real test for arms, cartridges and systems in general. Correct VTA adjustment will be crucial to your ability to play this record properly.

What Kind of Singer Is Dionne Warwick?

It is easier to define Dionne Warwick by what she isn’t rather than what she is. Although she grew up singing in church, she is not a gospel singer. Ella Fitzgerald and Sarah Vaughan are clear influences, but she is not a jazz singer. R&B is also part of her background, but she is not really a soul singer, either, at least not in the sense that Aretha Franklin is. Sophisticated is a word often used to describe her musical approach and the music she sings, but she is not a singer of standards such as Lena Horne or Nancy Wilson.

What is she, then?

She is a pop singer of a sort that perhaps could only have emerged out of the Brill Building environment of post-Elvis Presley, pre-Beatles urban pop in the early ’60s. That’s when she hooked up with Burt Bacharach and Hal David, songwriters and producers who wrote their unusually complicated songs for her aching yet detached alto voice.

Warwick is inescapably associated with those songs, even though she managed to build a career after leaving Bacharach and David that drew upon their style for other memorable recordings, and she remains a unique figure in popular music.

AMG

Fun Fact

As of April 2013, Warwick is tied for third with Madonna and behind only Aretha Franklin and Taylor Swift as the most-charted female vocalist of all time, with 56 of Dionne’s singles making the Billboard Hot 100 between 1962 and 1998.


We tried doing a shootout with a pile of clean copies recently (01/2015) and got about halfway through side two before we were forced to give up. The sound was bad or the vinyl was bad or both were bad on nearly every side. Those of you who scored a nice copy off the site, consider yourselves lucky; there probably won’t be another.

TRACK LISTING

Side One

Anyone Who Had a Heart
Shall I Tell Her
Don’t Make Me Over
Getting Ready for the Heartbreak
Oh Lord, What Are You Doing to Me

Side Two

Any Old Time of Day
Mr. Heartbreak
Put Yourself in My Place
I Could Make You Mine
This Empty Place
Please Make Him Love Me

Side Three

Wishin’ and Hopin’
Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah
Make the Music Play
If You See Bill
You’ll Never Get to Heaven
The Last One to Be Loved

Side Four

It’s Love That Really Counts
Unlucky
I Smiled Yesterday
Make It Easy on Yourself
The Love of a Boy
Only the Strong, Only the Brave

Wikipedia

Having been in a partnership with songwriters Burt Bacharach and Hal David, Warwick ranks among the 40 biggest hit makers of the entire rock era (1955–2012), based on the Billboard Hot 100 Pop Singles Charts. Dionne Warwick is one of the best selling singers of all time. As of April 2013, Warwick is tied for third with Madonna and behind only Aretha Franklin and Taylor Swift as the most-charted female vocalist of all time with 56 of Dionne’s singles making the Billboard Hot 100 between 1962 and 1998.

AMG Bio

It is easier to define Dionne Warwick by what she isn’t rather than what she is. Although she grew up singing in church, she is not a gospel singer. Ella Fitzgerald and Sarah Vaughan are clear influences, but she is not a jazz singer. R&B is also part of her background, but she is not really a soul singer, either, at least not in the sense that Aretha Franklin is. Sophisticated is a word often used to describe her musical approach and the music she sings, but she is not a singer of standards such as Lena Horne or Nancy Wilson.

What is she, then? She is a pop singer of a sort that perhaps could only have emerged out of the Brill Building environment of post-Elvis Presley, pre-Beatles urban pop in the early ’60s. That’s when she hooked up with Burt Bacharach and Hal David, songwriters and producers who wrote their unusually complicated songs for her aching yet detached alto voice. Warwick is inescapably associated with those songs, even though she managed to build a career after leaving Bacharach and David that drew upon their style for other memorable recordings, and she remains a unique figure in popular music.

Marie Dionne Warrick was born into a gospel-music family. Her father was a gospel record promoter for Chess Records and her mother managed the Drinkard Singers, a gospel group consisting of her relatives. She first raised her voice in song at age six at the New Hope Baptist Church in Newark, New Jersey, and soon after was a member of the choir. As a teenager, she formed a singing group called the Gospelaires with her sister Dee Dee and her aunt Cissy Houston (later the mother of the late Whitney Houston). After graduating from high school in 1959, she earned a music scholarship to the Hartt College of Music in Hartford, CT, but she also spent time with her group recording background vocals on sessions in New York. the Gospelaires are said to be present on such well-known recordings as Ben E. King’s “Spanish Harlem” and “Stand by Me.”

They were at a Drifters session working on a song called “Mexican Divorce” composed by Burt Bacharach when Bacharach, attending the session, suggested Warwick might do some demos for him. She did, singing songs he had written with lyricist Hal David. Bacharach and David pitched one of the songs to Florence Greenberg, head of the small independent Scepter Records label, and Greenberg liked the demo singer enough to sign her as a recording artist. Bacharach and David wrote and produced her first single, “Don’t Make Me Over,” in 1962. When the record was released, the performer credit contained a typo; it read “Dionne Warwick” instead of “Dionne Warrick,” and she kept the new name. (Her sister Dee Dee eventually became Dee Dee Warwick as well.)

“Don’t Make Me Over” peaked in the Top 20 of the pop charts in early 1963, also reaching the Top Five of the R&B charts. Warwick’s subsequent singles were not as successful, but in early 1964, she reached the pop and R&B Top Ten and the Top Five of the easy listening charts with “Anyone Who Had a Heart,” which was also her first record to reach the charts in the U.K. (There, such singers as Cilla Black and Dusty Springfield sometimes would cover her records before her own versions had a chance to become hits.)

“Walk on By” followed it into the Top Ten of the pop, easy listening, and U.K. charts in the spring of 1964, and it hit number one on the R&B charts. By then, the Beatles had arrived on the American scene, followed by the British Invasion, and for a while, pop artists like Warwick took a beating on the charts. Nevertheless, the singer continued to place singles and LPs in the rankings over the next couple of years and in the spring of 1966, she returned to the Top Ten of the pop charts and the Top Five of the R&B charts with “Message to Michael.”

Other, more modest hits followed, including the most successful U.S. recording of the title song from the movie Alfie, which reached the R&B Top Five and the pop Top 20 in the spring of 1967. That summer, Warwick topped the R&B LP charts with her gold-selling Here Where There Is Love album and by the fall, Scepter had amassed enough chart singles to issue Dionne Warwick’s Golden Hits, Pt. 1, her first album to reach the pop Top Ten.

Curiously, Warwick’s career reached a new level with a single not written by Bacharach and David, although they produced it. It was “(Theme From) Valley of the Dolls,” written by André and Dory Previn and issued at the end of 1967. The record reached the Top Five of the pop, R&B, and easy listening charts. Its B-side, Bacharach and David’s “I Say a Little Prayer,” reached the Top Five of the pop and R&B charts, helping the single become a gold record and the Valley of the Dolls LP also made the Top Five of the pop and R&B charts and went gold.

With that, Warwick was on a roll. Her next single, “Do You Know the Way to San José,” reached the pop Top Ten and the R&B and easy listening Top Five in the spring of 1968 and won the Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Pop Vocal Performance, Female. In the winter of 1969, her version of “This Guy’s in Love With You,” re-titled “This Girl’s in Love With You,” made the pop and R&B Top Ten and the easy listening Top Five and in early 1970, “I’ll Never Fall in Love Again” from Bacharach and David’s score for the Broadway musical Promises, Promises made the pop Top Ten and topped the easy listening charts, bringing her another Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Vocal Performance, Female.

In 1971, Warwick added an “e” to the end of her name on the advice of a numerologist, retaining the new spelling until 1975. She also left Scepter Records and signed a deal with the major label Warner Bros. that included Bacharach and David as her writer and producer. The team produced the 1972 album Dionne, which was a modest seller, but then Bacharach and David split up in the wake of the critical and commercial failure of their work on a musical remake of the film Lost Horizon in 1973. Due to her contractual commitment, Warwick was forced to sue her old partners. A settlement was reached, but they would not work together again for many years and Warwick’s career suffered.

Warwick bounced back with “Then Came You,” a song she recorded with the Spinners, which topped the pop and R&B charts and reached the Top Five of the easy listening charts in October 1974, going gold in the process. It proved to be a one-off success, but Warwick (now without the “e”) signed to Arista Records in 1979 and returned to the Top Five of the pop adult contemporary (formerly easy listening) charts with “I’ll Never Love This Way Again,” produced by labelmate Barry Manilow and featured on her first platinum-selling album, another LP simply titled Dionne. “Deja Vu,” also from the album, was a Top 20 pop and number one adult contemporary hit. “I’ll Never Love This Way Again” won Warwick her third Grammy for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female; “Deja Vu” won her her fourth for Best Rhythm & Blues Vocal Performance, Female.

Warwick topped the adult contemporary charts in 1980 with “No Night So Long,” but her next across-the-board hit did not come until she hooked up with the Bee Gees for her 1982 album Heartbreaker. Barry Gibb produced the gold-selling LP and the three Gibb brothers wrote the title song, which made the pop Top Ten and topped the adult contemporary charts. In 1985, Warwick was reconciled with Bacharach and she organized a charity recording of his and Carole Bayer Sager’s song “That’s What Friends Are For” to benefit AIDS, featuring Elton John, Gladys Knight, and Stevie Wonder, in addition to herself. The record topped the pop, R&B, and adult contemporary charts in the winter of 1985-1986, the album Friends on which it was included went gold, and the song earned Warwick her fifth Grammy for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal. In 1987, Warwick topped the adult contemporary charts and reached the Top Five of the R&B charts with “Love Power,” a duet with Jeffrey Osborne that was another Bacharach/Sager composition.

Now, a new album of Bacharach and David material, arrived in 2012 on H&I Music label and marked her 50th anniversary as a recording artist.

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