Aerosmith – Get Your Wings

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  • This outstanding copy of Aerosmith’s dynamic sophomore release boasts excellent Double Plus (A++) sound or BETTER from top to bottom – fairly quiet vinyl too
  • This album launched the band’s collaboration with Jack Douglas, who helped develop their distinctive sound and propel them from obscurity to stardom
  • 4 1/2 stars: “Get Your Wings, is where Aerosmith became Aerosmith … it’s where they shed much of their influences and developed their own trademark sound, it’s where they turned into songwriters…they’re doing their bloozy bluster better and bolder, which is what turns this sophomore effort into their first classic”

This vintage Columbia pressing has the kind of Tubey Magical Midrange that modern records rarely even BEGIN to reproduce. Folks, that sound is gone and it sure isn’t showing signs of coming back. If you love hearing INTO a recording, actually being able to “see” the performers, and feeling as if you are sitting in the studio with the band, this is the record for you. It’s what vintage all analog recordings are known for — this sound.

If you exclusively play modern repressings of vintage recordings, I can say without fear of contradiction that you have never heard this kind of sound on vinyl. Old records have it — not often, and certainly not always — but maybe one out of a hundred new records do, and those are some pretty long odds.

What the best sides of Get Your Wings have to offer is not hard to hear:

  • The biggest, most immediate staging in the largest acoustic space
  • The most Tubey Magic, without which you have almost nothing. CDs give you clean and clear. Only the best vintage vinyl pressings offer the kind of Tubey Magic that was on the tapes in 1974
  • Tight, note-like, rich, full-bodied bass, with the correct amount of weight down low
  • Natural tonality in the midrange — with all the instruments having the correct timbre
  • Transparency and resolution, critical to hearing into the three-dimensional space of the studio

No doubt there’s more but we hope that should do for now. Playing the record is the only way to hear all of the qualities we discuss above, and playing the best pressings against a pile of other copies under rigorously controlled conditions is the only way to find a pressing that sounds as good as this one does.

What to Listen For (WTLF)

Less grit – smoother and sweeter sound.

A bigger presentation – more size, more space, more room for all the instruments and voices to occupy. The bigger the speakers you play this record on the better.

More bass and tighter bass. This is a rock record. It needs weight down low to rock the way Aerosmith is supposed to.

Present, breathy vocals. A veiled midrange is the rule, not the exception.

Good top end extension to reproduce the harmonics of the instruments and details of the recording including the studio ambience.

Last but not least, balance. All the elements from top to bottom should be heard in harmony with each other. Take our word for it, assuming you haven’t played a pile of these yourself, balance is not that easy to find. Our best copies will have it though, of that there is no doubt.

TRACK LISTING

Side One

Same Old Song And Dance
Lord Of The Thighs
Spaced
Woman Of The World

Side Two

S.O.S. (Too Bad)
Train Kept A Rollin’
Seasons Of Wither
Pandora’s Box

AMG 4 1/2 Star Review

Often overshadowed by the subsequent twin highlights of Toys in the Attic and Rocks, Aerosmith’s 1974 second album, Get Your Wings, is where Aerosmith became Aerosmith — it’s where they teamed up with producer Jack Douglas, it’s where they shed much of their influences and developed their own trademark sound, it’s where they turned into songwriters, it’s where Steven Tyler unveiled his signature obsessions with sex and sleaze.

Chief among these attributes may be Douglas, who either helped the band ease into the studio or captured their sound in a way their debut never did. This is a leaner, harder album, bathed in grease and layered in grit, but it’s not just down to Douglas. The band itself sounds more distinctive. There are blues in Joe Perry and Joey Kramer’s interplay, but this leapfrogs over blues-rock; it turns into slippery hard rock.

To be sure, it’s still easy to hear the Stones here, but they never really sound Stonesy; there’s almost more of the Yardbirds to the way the group works the riffs, particularly evident on the cover of the early ‘Birds classic “The Train Kept a Rollin’.”

But if the Yardbirds were tight and nervy, Aerosmith is blown out and loose, the sound of excess incarnate — that is, in every way but the writing itself, which is confident and strong, fueled by Tyler’s gonzo sex drive. He is the “Lord of the Thighs,” playing that “Same Old Song and Dance,” but he also slows down enough for the eerie “Seasons of Wither,” a powerful slow-churning ballad whose mastery of atmosphere is a good indication of how far the band has grown.

They never attempted anything quite so creepy on their debut, but it isn’t just that Aerosmith is trying newer things on Get Your Wings, it’s that they’re doing their bloozy bluster better and bolder, which is what turns this sophomore effort into their first classic.

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