Gary McFarland – Does The Sun Really Shine On The Moon?

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Look at the track listing — these are pop tunes by The Beatles and The Beach Boys set to jazzy arrangements, perfect for your bachelor pad. Enjoy this one for what it is — enchanting pop tunes without the vocals, superbly well recorded and well played by jazz guys who know how to have fun with these kinds of songs. 

DCC did this title on CD and if you want one just drop us a note and we will include one with your order gratis.

This copy is dramatically more open and spacious than any of the other copies we’ve heard. The organ and bass are especially well recorded.

Drop the needle on God Only Knows to get a taste of how good side one sounds.

Tubey Magic

For us audiophiles both the sound and the music here are enchanting. If you’re looking to demonstrate just how good 1968 Tubey Analog sound can be, this killer copy may be just the record for you!

This copy is super spacious, sweet and positively dripping with ambience. Talk about Tubey Magic, the liquidity of the sound here is positively uncanny. This is vintage analog at its best, so full-bodied and relaxed you’ll wonder how it ever came to be that anyone seriously contemplated trying to improve it.

This IS the sound of Tubey Magic. No recordings will ever be made like this again, and no CD will ever capture what is in the grooves of this record. Someday there may well be a CD of this album, but those of us in possession of a working turntable could care less.

Dave Sanders

Engineering duties were handled by Dave Sanders, the man who recorded one of our favorite Pop Jazz Vocal albums, Lena Horne & Gabor Szabo’s Lena & Gabor, also on the short lived but no less wonderful Skye label.

TRACK LISTING

Side One

God Only Knows
By the Time I Get to Phoenix
Sunday Will Never Be the Same
Lady Jane
Flamingo

Side Two

Flea Market
Here, There and Everywhere
Three Years Ago
O Morro
Melancholy Baby
Up, Up and Away

Gary McFarland

Largely forgotten now, Gary McFarland was one of the more significant contributors to orchestral jazz during the early ’60s. An “adult prodigy,” as Gene Lees accurately noted, McFarland was an ingenious composer whose music could reveal shades of complex emotional subtlety and clever childlike simplicity.

In 1955, he took up playing the vibes. He attained early notoriety and success working with Gerry Mulligan, Johnny Hodges, John Lewis, Stan Getz, Bob Brookmeyer, and Anita O’Day.

McFarland began devoting more attention to his own career by 1963 when he released what is often regarded as his most significant recording, The Gary McFarland Orchestra/Special Guest Soloist: Bill Evans. He also recorded in small-group settings, which featured his clever vibes playing.

The success of his instrumental pop collection, Soft Samba, allowed McFarland to form his first performing group. But his recordings thereafter, more often than not, featured an easy listening instrumental pop bent. McFarland went on to excellent work with Gabor Szabo, Shirley Scott, Zoot Sims, and Steve Kuhn, but only rarely featured his outstanding compositional talents (as in 1968’s America the Beautiful).

Artist Biography by Douglas Payne