Talking Heads – Stop Making Sense

  • A wonderful sounding copy with solid Double Plus (A++) sound on both sides – exceptionally quiet vinyl too
  • Both sides are big, bold and dynamic, with the kind of energy that you rarely find outside the live event
  • “”A bona fide classic,” opined Neil Jeffries in a five-star review of the reissue for Empire, “a perfectly measured snapshot of a widely loved and respected band playing at the height of their powers … No other band could do this. No other music movie soundtrack sounds this good.”” Wikipedia

What the best sides of this New Wave Classic Album have to offer is not hard to hear:

  • The biggest, most immediate staging in the largest acoustic space
  • The most Tubey Magic, without which you have almost nothing. CDs give you clean and clear. Only the best vintage vinyl pressings offer the kind of Tubey Magic that was on the tapes in 1984
  • Tight, note-like, rich, full-bodied bass, with the correct amount of weight down low
  • Natural tonality in the midrange — with the guitars, keyboards, drums and percussion having the correct sound for a live recording
  • Transparency and resolution, critical to hearing into the three-dimensional space of the concert venue

No doubt there’s more but we hope that should do for now. Playing the record is the only way to hear all of the above, and playing each pressing against a pile of other copies under rigorously controlled conditions is the only way to find a pressing that sounds as good as this one does.

What We Listen For on Stop Making Sense

Less grit – smoother and sweeter sound, something that is not easy to come by on any Talking Heads album.

A bigger presentation – more size, more space, more room for all the instruments and voices to occupy. The bigger the speakers you have to play this record the better.

More bass and tighter bass. This is fundamentally a pure rock record. It needs weight down low to rock the way Glyn Johns wanted it to.

Present, breathy vocals. A veiled midrange is the rule, not the exception.

Good top end extension to reproduce the harmonics of the instruments and details of the recording including the studio ambience.

Last but not least, balance. All the elements from top to bottom should be heard in harmony with each other. Take our word for it, assuming you haven’t played a pile of these yourself, balance is not that easy to find.

Our best copies will have it though, of that there is no doubt.

Not only is it hard to find great copies of this album, it ain’t easy to play ’em either. You’re going to need a hi-res, super low distortion front end with careful adjustment of your arm in every area — VTA, tracking weight, azimuth and anti-skate — in order to play this album properly. If you’ve got the goods you’re gonna love the way this copy sounds. Play it with a budget cart / table / arm and you’re likely to hear a great deal less magic than we did.

TRACK LISTING

Side One

Psycho Killer
Swamp
Slippery People
Burning Down The House
Girlfriend Is Better

Side Two

Once In A Lifetime
What A Day That Was
Life During Wartime
Take Me To The Rive

Wikipedia Reviews

“A bona fide classic,” opined Neil Jeffries in a five-star review of the reissue for Empire, “a perfectly measured snapshot of a widely loved and respected band playing at the height of their powers … No other band could do this. No other music movie soundtrack sounds this good.”

“A timely reminder of the achievements of perhaps the most underrated band of the post-punk age,” concurred Q. “From its stripped-down intro … to the nine-piece finale, Stop Making Sense remains heady, stirring stuff.”

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