Top Engineers – Chris Thomas

Eno – Here Come The Warm Jets

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  • KILLER sound from start to finish for this Island import pressing with both sides finishing top of the class — Triple Plus (A+++) sound throughout
  • The sound here is clean, clear, present and dynamic yet still super rich and musical with lots of Tubey Magic
  • Exceptionally quiet vinyl — Mint Minus to Mint Minus Minus on both sides
  • 5 stars on Allmusic: “Eno’s solo debut, Here Come the Warm Jets, is a spirited, experimental collection of unabashed pop songs… Avant-garde yet very accessible, Here Come the Warm Jets still sounds exciting, forward-looking, and densely detailed, revealing more intricacies with every play.”

A great pressing of one of our favorite albums! These are not easy to come by, so we don’t get to shoot these out as often as we’d like. This is not your typical audiophile-friendly rock album, to be sure. There are lots of weird sounds, out-of-tune instruments and other Eno craziness. We’re big Eno fans here — Taking Tiger Mountain and Before And After Science are other big favorites here. If you’ve got a taste for avant-garde art rock, this album should be right up your alley. (more…)

Eno – Here Come The Warm Jets – Our Shootout Winning Copy from 2007

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This British Island Sunray LP is the copy we’ve been waiting for! We love this music but we’d never heard a copy of this album that could hold its own sonically with our Hot Stamper copies of Taking Tiger Mountain — until we played this one.

We hardly ever see enough clean copies of this to do a full shootout, but we know Hot Stamper sound when we hear it and this copy’s got it — on BOTH sides. It’s got a wonderfully meaty bottom end that was missing from many of the copies we’ve played before. Baby’s On Fire is super punchy, and Cindy Tells Me has AMAZING bass. The vocals are full-bodied and breathy with lots of texture and wonderful presence. The clarity here is superb — none of the smearing so common to the domestic pressings. (more…)

The Pretenders’ Debut Album

More The Pretenders

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  • Insanely good sound throughout — Triple Plus (A+++) on the second side, Double Plus (A++) on the first – we rarely have copies that rock the way this one does
  • This is one of engineer Bill Price’s better efforts behind the boards, and Chris Thomas’s production is State of the Art
  • Relatively quiet vinyl throughout this early UK pressing – Mint Minus to Mint Minus Minus
  • Five Stars: “Few rock & roll records rock as hard or with as much originality as the Pretenders’ eponymous debut album. A sleek, stylish fusion of Stonesy rock & roll, new wave pop, and pure punk aggression, Pretenders is teeming with sharp hooks and a viciously cool attitude.”

What really separated this copy from the pack was the lack of edge on the vocals. It’s not duller — it’s bigger and clearer yet less distorted and cut cleaner than most of the other sides we played. (more…)

Chris Thomas Is One of Our Favorite Engineers

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CHRIS THOMAS is one of our favorite engineers and producers. Click on the links below to find our Chris Thomas engineered or produced albums, along with plenty of our famous commentaries.  

Chris Thomas Engineered or Produced Albums with Hot Stampers

Chris Thomas Engineered or Produced Albums We’ve Reviewed

Elton John’s Too Low For Zero – The Last in a Great Run

More Elton John

More Too Low For Zero

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  • You’ll find excellent Double Plus (A++) grades on both sides of this early British import LP – quiet vinyl too
  • There’s some real Tubey Magic on this album, along with breathy vocals and plenty of rock and roll energy 
  • I Guess That’s Why They Call It The Blues – the best song Elton’s done in the last 35 years – is killer here
  • One of engineer Bill Price’s best efforts behind the boards in the ’80s, and Chris Thomas’s production is State of the Art as usual
  • Allmusic 4 1/2 Stars: “Happily, this is a reunion that works like gangbusters, capturing everybody at a near-peak of their form.” 

Much of the production — the smooth, sweet harmony vocals, the rich, grungy guitars, the solid, warm piano — reminds me of Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, one of the classics from back in the day when Gus Dudgeon was running the show.

Caribou (1974) and Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy (1975) have a similarly glossy, perfectionist approach to production as well of course. It was 1975’s Rock of the Westies that went off in another direction. (more…)