Advice – Basic Concepts and Realities Explained

Letter of the Week – Maiden Voyage

Maiden Voyage

One of our good customers had this to say about some Hot Stampers he purchased recently: 

Hey Tom,   

I have to commend you once again. I have never heard Maiden Voyage like this before. The transparency on this copy is superb! I gave up listening to my reissue a while back. It had a heavy veil hanging over it that was obvious. Yet as the listener I yearned to hear past it because the music itself is so wonderful. Thanks for digging up this treasure. It will bring many hours of enjoyment now and in the future.

Records are a tangible investment for the listener. When you find a great copy you hang on to it because it engages you. It moves you in a real sense. A collector who collects for value of first issue is a collector too. However they collect as one would coins, stamps or baseball cards. The value is attributed to what is perceived not what is experienced. I do not slam anyone for this. If joy is found in this manner then, so be it.

I collect records to enjoy the music and if that means digging thru a number of pressings to find the best one or paying the bucks from someone like Better Records, so be it. If a reissue is better than an earlier pressing I will hold on to the re issue. This is a rarity but does happen. I can think of at least 20 LPs I have that I still favor the reissue over all others. Both collectors are valid. They simply have different goals in mind.

Thanks
Mark

Mark, thank you for your letter. We actually have a commentary about this very subject, entitled Collecting for the Sake of Collecting — Records Versus Hot Stampers, which we have reproduced below.

It discusses why Record Collecting as it is commonly understood is not something in which we can muster much interest these days, although we used to, and is certainly not something we recommend to our customers, “as it is commonly understood” being key to our point here.

Anyone can collect records: originals, imports, audiophile pressings, picture discs, the TAS List, what have you. There are literally millions of records for sale at any given time. (A single collection for sale as of this writing contains more than 3 million records.)

Some people see them as an investment. We do not. We think audiophile-oriented music lovers should pursue good sounding records for the purpose of playing them and enjoying them, understanding that the better their records sound the more enjoyable they will be. Collecting records primarily to build a record collection that can be sold at a profit in the future should be the last thing on anyone’s mind.

Most of the following was written in response to a customer who wanted to know how original our Hot Stamper pressings were since he preferred to collect first pressings — which were also worth more money should he decide to sell them at a later date. We asked:

Why would you want a first pressing if it didn’t sound as good? Or, if a later pressing sounded better, why would that make any difference in your desire to buy it? Isn’t the idea to get good sound?

An Awful Collection

If you buy records principally to collect original pressings, you will end up with one awful sounding collection of records, that I can tell you without fear of contradiction. On the other hand, if you want the best sounding pressings, we are the only record sellers on the planet who can consistently find them for you. This is precisely the service we offer, unique in the world as far as we know. Hence the name Better Records. (more…)