_Composers – Britten

Britten – Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra – Ozawa – Our Shootout Winner from 2009

More of the music of Britten 

More Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra – Ozawa 

xxxxx

A distinguished member of the Better Records Orchestral Music Hall of Fame

The sound of this White Hot Stamper side two is SUPER TRANSPARENT — you can hear all the way to the back of the hall and then some! There’s so much ambience on this pressing it forced us to reevaluate the other copies in light of the sound we were discovering here.

As if that wasn’t enought, it had energy and immediacy we simply did not expect to hear. The sound is big and bold during the loud passages, but sweet and delicate when, for example, the woodwinds are spotlighted in the composition.  (more…)

Britten / Piano & Violin Concertos / Richter – Reviewed in 2011

More of the music of Britten 

More Piano & Violin Concertos / Richter 

xxxxx

A distinguished member of the Better Records Orchestral Music Hall of Fame

This London pressing has Super Hot Stamper sound on side two, the Violin Concerto side. Here the violin sounds superb — rich, sweet and natural. The brass on this side is HUGE, which is a bit shocking for a later London from 1971. Once you get past the ’60s the sound of most Londons is opaque and flat (which describes perfectly far too many Londons with Solti at the helm), but not so here. The stage is as deep and wide as any vintage Golden Age recording we’ve played recently, and we’ve played plenty.  (more…)

The Bloated Cello Sound Some Audiophiles Seem to Love

The Bloated Cello Sound Some Audiophiles Seem to Love

xxxxx

Another in our series of Home Audio Exercises with advice on What to Listen For (WTLF) as you critically evaluate any and all cello recordings you may own.

On this pressing we were a bit surprised by how unusually natural the cello sounded — more like the real instrument and less like the typical recording of it. 

Normally when recording the cello the microphones are placed fairly close to the instrument. This often results in what’s known as the “proximity effect,” which simply describes a boost in the lower frequencies relative to the more linear response of the microphone when placed at a distance. (more…)