Sonny Rollins – Taking Care Of Business

More Sonny Rollins

  • This outstanding pressing boasts Shootout Winning Triple Plus (A+++) sound or close to it on all four sides – exceptionally quiet vinyl too
  • The complete Tenor Madness album is found here, with big, full-bodied, MONO jazz sound at its BEST, courtesy of the great one, Rudy Van Gelder
  • This is what classic ’50s jazz is supposed to sound like – they knew how to do these kinds of records forty years ago, and those mastering skills are in short supply nowadays, if not downright extinct
  • The transfers from 1978 by David Turner are in tune with the sound of these recordings – there’s not a trace of phony EQ on this entire record
  • “Tenor Madness was the recording that, once and for all, established Newk as one of the premier tenor saxophonists, an accolade that in retrospect, has continued through six full decades and gives an indication why a young Rollins was so well liked, as his fluency, whimsical nature, and solid construct of melodies and solos gave him the title of the next Coleman Hawkins or Lester Young of mainstream jazz.”

This Two-Fer includes all of Tenor Madness and most of Work Time and Tour De Force.

Top jazz players such as Ray Bryant, John Coltrane, Red Garland, Kenny Drew, Max Roach and Paul Chambers can be heard on the album.

If you want all the tubey magic of the earlier pressings, a top quality pressing of the real Tenor Madness album on Prestige is going to give you more of that sound. David Turner’s mastering setup in the ’70s has a healthy dose of tubes, but it can’t compete in that area with the All Tube cutting systems that were making records in the ’50s and ’60s.  Without one of those early pressing around to compare, we don’t think you’re going to feel you are missing out on anything in the sound with this killer copy.

And where can you find an early Prestige pressing with audiophile playing surfaces like these?  

This vintage Prestige pressing has the kind of Tubey Magical Midrange that modern records can barely BEGIN to reproduce. Folks, that sound is gone and it sure isn’t showing signs of coming back. If you love hearing INTO a recording, actually being able to “see” the performers, and feeling as if you are sitting in the studio with the band, this is the record for you. It’s what vintage all analog recordings are known for — this sound.

If you exclusively play modern repressings of vintage recordings, I can say without fear of contradiction that you have never heard this kind of sound on vinyl. Old records have it — not often, and certainly not always — but maybe one out of a hundred new records do, and those are some pretty long odds.

What the best sides of Taking Care Of Business have to offer is not hard to hear

  • The biggest, most immediate staging in the largest acoustic space
  • The most Tubey Magic, without which you have almost nothing. CDs give you clean and clear. Only the best vintage vinyl pressings offer the kind of Tubey Magic that was on the tapes in 1956
  • Tight, note-like, rich, full-bodied bass, with the correct amount of weight down low
  • Natural tonality in the midrange — with all the instruments having the correct timbre
  • Transparency and resolution, critical to hearing into the three-dimensional studio space

No doubt there’s more but we hope that should do for now. Playing the record is the only way to hear all of the qualities we discuss above, and playing the best pressings against a pile of other copies under rigorously controlled conditions is the only way to find a pressing that sounds as good as this one does.

Album Background

Side 1 and Side 2, #1 originally included on Work Time (Prestige 7020); Side 2, #2-4 and Side 3, #1 and 2 originally issued as Tenor Madness (P-7047); “Sonny Boy” included on Sonny Boy (P-7207); and the balance of Sides 3 and 4 on Tour de Force (P-7126). “Tenor Madness” and “When Your Lover Has Gone” were reissued as part of the “twofer” Sonny Rollins (P-24004) but are also included here so that the important Tenor Madness session can be presented in its entirety.

What We’re Listening For on Taking Care Of Business

  • Energy for starters. What could be more important than the life of the music?
  • The Big Sound comes next — wall to wall, lots of depth, huge space, three-dimensionality, all that sort of thing.
  • Then transient information — fast, clear, sharp attacks, not the smear and thickness so common to these LPs.
  • Tight punchy bass — which ties in with good transient information, also the issue of frequency extension further down.
  • Next: transparency — the quality that allows you to hear deep into the soundfield, showing you the space and air around all the instruments.
  • Extend the top and bottom and voila, you have The Real Thing — an honest to goodness Hot Stamper.

TRACK LISTING

Side One

A1 There’s No Business Like Show Business Written-By – Irving Berlin 6:18
A2 Raincheck Written-By – Billy Strayhorn 5:59
A3 There Are Such Things Written-By – Baer*, Meyer*, Adams* 9:26

Side Two

B1 It’s All Right With Me Written-By – Cole Porter 6:05
B2 My Reverie Written-By – Larry Clinton 5:10
B3 Paul’s Pal Written-By – Sonny Rollins 6:07
B4 The Most Beautiful Girl In The World Written-By – Rodgers – Hart* 5:34

Side Three

C1 Tenor Madness Written-By – Rollins* 12:07
C2 When Your Lover Has Gone Written-By – E. A. Swan* 6:10
C3 Ee-Ah Written-By – Rollins* 6:54

Side Four

D1 Sonny Boy Written-By – Jolson*, DeSylva*, Brown*, Henderson* 8:21
D2 B. Swift Written-By – Rollins* 5:15
D3 B. Quick Written-By – Rollins* 9:12

AMG Tenor Madness Review by Michael G. Nastos

At a time when he was a member of the legendary Clifford Brown/Max Roach sextet, Sonny Rollins was still the apple fallen not too far from the tree of Miles Davis. Tenor Madness was the recording that, once and for all, established Newk as one of the premier tenor saxophonists, an accolade that in retrospect, has continued through six full decades and gives an indication why a young Rollins was so well liked, as his fluency, whimsical nature, and solid construct of melodies and solos gave him the title of the next Coleman Hawkins or Lester Young of mainstream jazz. With the team of pianist Red Garland, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Philly Joe Jones, staples of that era’s Miles Davis combos, Rollins has all the rhythmic ammunition to cut loose, be free, and extrapolate on themes as only he could, and still can. This is most evident on his version of “The Most Beautiful Girl in the World,” started in its normal choppy waltz time, followed by a sax/drums prelude, a drum solo from Jones, and steamed from there on in, a hot 4/4 romp. Garland is particularly outstanding for keeping up the pace, depth and placement on this one. A bluesy version of “When Your Lover Has Gone,” again enlivened by Jones, and the legendary title track with Rollins and John Coltrane trading long solos, and fours with Jones, are tunes that in the mid-’50s defined the parlance “blowing session.” “Paul’s Pal,” in tribute to Chambers, has become a standard in its own right with a bright, memorable melody showing the good humor of Rollins, especially on the second time through, while the saxophonist’s ability to sing vocal like tones through his horn is no better evinced as during the light ballad “My Reverie.” A recording that should stand proudly alongside Saxophone Colossus as some of the best work of Sonny Rollins in his early years, it’s also a testament to the validity, vibrancy, and depth of modern jazz in the post-World War era. It belongs on everybody’s shelf.

Concord Music

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