Rush – Signals

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  • Astonishing Triple Triple (A+++) sonic grades clearly make this one of the best copies to ever hit the site
  • Huge synths and prodigious bass have both of these sides rockin’ like you will not believe
  • Individual notes aren’t smeared, they have body and attack, and there’s no shortage of energy to the complex playing
  • 4 stars: “Rush didn’t forget how to rock out — “The Analog Kid” and “Digital Man” were some of their most up-tempo compositions in years.”

If you’re a fan of the band, you know what these guys are about — big-time technical prowess, dizzying effects, powerful solos and so forth. Many copies we played didn’t let you hear just how hard these guys are shredding… and then what’s the point? If the musicianship gets lost in the mastering, why bother with this band at all? We were looking for copies that didn’t let us forget who we were listening to.

Only the better pressings like this one give you the sound this music demands: rich and full-bodied with serious punch to the bottom end; an open, extended top; size and space, wonderful clarity and transparency; and most importantly of all, ENERGY. The life of the music is the number one quality we look for in rock, prog rock, art rock, folk rock and every other kind of rock we play. That will never change.

The drums and cymbals sound just right, which is essential on a Rush album — as just about everyone knows, Neil Peart’s drumming is a major highlight of anything the band does.

What the Best Sides of Signals Have to Offer Is Not Hard to Hear

  • The biggest, most immediate staging in the largest acoustic space
  • The most Tubey Magic, without which you have almost nothing. CDs give you clean and clear. Only the best vintage vinyl pressings offer the kind of Tubey Magic that was on the tapes in 1982
  • Tight, note-like, rich, full-bodied bass, with the correct amount of weight down low
  • Natural tonality in the midrange — with all the instruments having the correct timbre
  • Transparency and resolution, critical to hearing into the three-dimensional studio space

No doubt there’s more but we hope that should do for now. Playing the record is the only way to hear all of the qualities we discuss above, and playing the best pressings against a pile of other copies under rigorously controlled conditions is the only way to find a pressing that sounds as good as this one does.

What We’re Listening For on Signals

  • Energy for starters. What could be more important than the life of the music?
  • Then: presence and immediacy. The vocals aren’t “back there” somewhere, lost in the mix. They’re front and center where any recording engineer worth his salt would put them.
  • The Big Sound comes next — wall to wall, lots of depth, huge space, three-dimensionality, all that sort of thing.
  • Then transient information — fast, clear, sharp attacks, not the smear and thickness so common to these LPs.
  • Tight punchy bass — which ties in with good transient information, also the issue of frequency extension further down.
  • Next: transparency — the quality that allows you to hear deep into the soundfield, showing you the space and air around all the instruments.
  • Extend the top and bottom and voila, you have The Real Thing — an honest to goodness Hot Stamper.

TRACK LISTING

Side One

Subdivisions
The Analog Kid
Chemistry
Digital Man

Side Two

The Weapon
New World Man
Losing It
Countdown

AMG Review

Instead of playing it safe and writing Moving Pictures, Pt. II, Rush replaced their heavy rock of yesteryear with even more modern sounds for 1982’s Signals. Synthesizers were now an integral part of the band’s sound, and replaced electric guitars as the driving force for almost all the tracks.

And more current and easier-to-grasp topics (teen peer pressure, repression, etc.) replaced their trusty old sci-fi-inspired lyrics. While other rock bands suddenly added keyboards to their sound to widen their appeal, Rush gradually merged electronics into their music over the years, so such tracks as the popular MTV video “Subdivisions” did not come as a shock to longtime fans.

And Rush didn’t forget how to rock out — “The Analog Kid” and “Digital Man” were some of their most up-tempo compositions in years. The surprise hit, “New World Man,” and “Chemistry” combined reggae and rock (begun on 1980’s Permanent Waves), “The Weapon” bordered on new wave, the placid “Losing It” featured Ben Mink on electric violin, while the epic closer “Countdown” painted a vivid picture of a space shuttle launch.

Signals proved that Rush were successfully adapting to the musical climate of the early ’80s.