The Beatles – A Hard Day’s Night

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  • With outstanding Double Plus (A++) sound from start to finish and exceptionally quiet vinyl, this copy has the Fab Four energy and enthusiasm you’ve been looking for and simply won’t find anywhere else
  • Drop the needle on I’ll Cry Instead, If I Fell or Things We Said Today to hear some real early Beatles Vocal Magic
  • This one gets the heart of the music right – the singing – and that’s what makes The Beatles FUN to listen to
  • 100% Lennon-McCartney originals: “Decades after its original release, its punchy blend of propulsive rhythms, jangly guitars, and infectious, singalong melodies is remarkably fresh.”

Drop the needle on any song on either side to see why we went crazy over this one. The emotional quality of the boys’ performances really comes through on this copy. They aren’t just singing — they’re really BELTIN’ it out. Can you imagine what that sounds like on the title track? We didn’t have to imagine it, WE HEARD IT!

What the best sides of this Fab Four Classic have to offer is not hard to hear:

  • The biggest, most immediate staging in the largest acoustic space
  • The most Tubey Magic, without which you have almost nothing. CDs give you clean and clear. Only the best vintage vinyl domestic pressings like this one offer the kind of Tubey Magic that was on the tapes in 1964
  • Tight, note-like, rich, full-bodied bass, with the correct amount of weight down low
  • Natural tonality in the midrange — with all the keyboards, guitars and drums having the correct sound for this kind of recording
  • Transparency and resolution, critical to hearing into the three-dimensional space of the studio

No doubt there’s more but we hope that should do for now. Playing the record is the only way to hear all of the above, and playing the best pressings against a pile of other copies under rigorously controlled conditions is the only way to find a pressing that sounds as good as this one does.

It’s (Almost) All About The Midrange

There are two important traits that all the best copies have in common. Tonally they aren’t bright and aggressive (which eliminates 80 percent of the AHDN pressings you find), and they have a wonderful midrange warmth and sweetness that brings out the unique quality of the Beatles’ individual voices and harmonies.

When comparing pressings of this record, the copies that get their voices to sound present, while at the same time warm, smooth, and sweet, especially during the harmonies and in the loudest choruses are always the best. All the other instruments seem to fall in line when the vocals are correct. This is an old truism — it’s all about the midrange — but in this case, it really is true.

This music has a HUGE amount of upper midrange and high frequency information. (Just note how present the tambourines are in the mixes.) If the record isn’t cut properly or pressed properly for that matter, the sound can be quite unpleasant. (One of our good customers made an astute comment in an email to us — the typical copy of this album makes you want to turn DOWN the volume.)

Play it against your MoFi or Heavy Vinyl pressing and you will quickly see why those remastered LPs bore us to tears. Who in his right mind would want to suffer through a boring Beatles record when you can hear how much life and joy there is in these songs even playing over the radio!?

What We’re Listening For on A Hard Day’s Night

  • Energy for starters. What could be more important than the life of the music?
  • The Big Sound comes next — wall to wall, lots of depth, huge space, three-dimensionality, all that sort of thing.
  • Then transient information — fast, clear, sharp attacks for the guitars and drums, not the smear and thickness common to most LPs.
  • Tight, note-like bass with clear fingering — which ties in with good transient information, as well as the issue of frequency extension further down.
  • Next: transparency — the quality that allows you to hear deep into the soundfield, showing you the space and air around all the players.
  • Then: presence and immediacy. The musicians aren’t “back there” somewhere, way behind the speakers. They’re front and center where any recording engineer worth his salt would have put them.
  • Extend the top and bottom and voila, you have The Real Thing — an honest to goodness Hot Stamper.

Track Commentary

Be sure to click on the Track Listing tab above to see our specific track by track commentary.

TRACK LISTING

Side One

A Hard Day’s Night
I Should Have Known Better
If I Fell Track Commentary

This is a wonderful example of The Beatles’ harmonies at their best. Toward the end of the song, during one of their harmonic excursions, you can hear John’s voice drop out when something apparently catches in his throat, and I could swear that you can hear Paul McCartney react to it with a little laugh.

If their voices sound warm, sweet, and transparent on this track, at the very least you have a contender, and possibly a winner. Not many pressings are going to bring out all the qualities of their voices.

I’m Happy Just to Dance With You
And I Love Her
Tell Me Why
Can’t Buy Me Love Track Commentary

Always starts with a bit of grit and grain, but sounds better by the second verse.

Side Two

Any Time at All
I’ll Cry Instead Track Commentary

This track has a tendency to sound a bit aggressive on even the best copies. The copies with extended highs and a tonally correct midrange are really going to excel on this track.

Things We Said Today Track Commentary

This track is really rich and full-bodied on the best copies. It’s got wonderful Tubey Magic that is positively intoxicating.

When I Get Home Track Commentary

Another one with a lot of potentially aggressive qualities. If you can play this song good and loud, you must have an excellent copy. (More cowbell!)

You Can’t Do That
I’ll Be Back

AMG 5 Star Rave Review

A Hard Day’s Night not only was the de facto soundtrack for their movie, not only was it filled with nothing but Lennon-McCartney originals, but it found the Beatles truly coming into their own as a band. All of the disparate influences on their first two albums had coalesced into a bright, joyous, original sound, filled with ringing guitars and irresistible melodies. A Hard Day’s Night is where the Beatles became mythical, but this is the sound of Beatlemania in all of its giddy glory.

Decades after its original release, its punchy blend of propulsive rhythms, jangly guitars, and infectious, singalong melodies is remarkably fresh. There’s something intrinsically exciting in the sound of the album itself, something to keep the record vital years after it was recorded. Even more impressive are the songs themselves… [E]verything on the record is performed with genuine glee and excitement. It’s the pinnacle of their early years.