Stevie Nicks – Speculate Shmeculate

Albums with Stevie Nicks Performing

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Another in our ongoing series of Random Thoughts on issues concerning music and recordings. 

The sound of the typical copy can best be summed up in three words: thin, hard and bright. When the sound is thin or hard or bright the fun factor of this mainstream drops to zero. Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around and Leather And Lace both sound great on the radio, why not on Warners vinyl? We can’t blame Sheffield Labs, the original cutting house: all the copies we played — good, bad and otherwise — were originals and mastered by them.

Could it be the vinyl? It could. It could be a lot of things, but speculating about them doesn’t really get us or you anywhere, so I’m going to stop doing it and just say we played a big pile of records and heard a lot of unpleasant sound. If you have the record you probably know what I mean.


Stevie Nicks’ solo career was off to an impressive, if overdue, start with Bella Donna, which left no doubt that she could function quite well without the input of her colleagues in Fleetwood Mac. The album yielded a number of hits that seemed omnipresent in the ’80s, including the moving “Leather and Lace” (which unites Nicks with Don Henley), the poetic “Edge of Seventeen,” and her rootsy duet with Tom Petty, “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around.”

But equally engaging are less exposed tracks like the haunting “After the Glitter Fades.” Hit producer Jimmy Iovine wisely avoids over-producing, and keeps things sounding organic on this striking debut.

Allmusic

TRACK LISTING

Side One

Bella Donna
Kind Of Woman
Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around
Think About It
After The Glitter Fades

Side Two

Edge Of Seventeen
How Still My Love
Leather And Lace
Outside The Rain
The Highwayman

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