Dave Brubeck – Anything Goes!

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  • With two Triple Plus (A+++) Shootout Winning sides, this original stereo copy simply could not be beat, and it plays as quietly as these 360 stereo pressings ever do
  • This is a Must Own for fans of the later Brubeck albums (the ones in standard time signatures) or simply for those who want to hear these marvelous Cole Porter songs played with style and verve by musicians of consummate skill
  • “The Quartet performs eight of Cole Porter’s most famous songs on this enjoyable outing. Few surprises occur but the music often swings hard, pianist Brubeck and altoist Paul Desmond take several excellent solos and bassist Eugene Wright and drummer Joe Morello really push the group.”

This vintage 360 pressing has the kind of Tubey Magical Midrange that modern records can barely BEGIN to reproduce. Folks, that sound is gone and it sure isn’t showing signs of coming back. If you love hearing INTO a recording, actually being able to “see” the performers, and feeling as if you are sitting in the studio with the band, this is the record for you. It’s what vintage all analog recordings are known for — this sound.

If you exclusively play modern repressings of vintage recordings, I can say without fear of contradiction that you have never heard this kind of sound on vinyl. Old records have it — not often, and certainly not always — but maybe one out of a hundred new records do, and those are some pretty long odds.

What outstanding sides such as these have to offer is not hard to hear:

  • The biggest, most immediate staging in the largest acoustic space
  • The most Tubey Magic, without which you have almost nothing. CDs give you clean and clear. Only the best vintage vinyl pressings offer the kind of Tubey Magic that was on the tapes in 1967
  • Tight, note-like, rich, full-bodied bass, with the correct amount of weight down low
  • Natural tonality in the midrange — with all the instruments having the correct timbre
  • Transparency and resolution, critical to hearing into the three-dimensional studio space

No doubt there’s more but we hope that should do for now. Playing the record is the only way to hear all of the qualities we discuss above, and playing the best pressings against a pile of other copies under rigorously controlled conditions is the only way to find a pressing that sounds as good as this one does.

Best Practices

Recently we did a shootout for a record we knew little about, this one, using a group of pressings we had earlier auditioned and which had impressed us with their sound quality. We thought the 360 stereo pressings were the best, and since some of the ’70s Red Label pressings seemed to be fine, we included them as well. The mono 360 we had on hand was small and recessed as so many of them are and consequently did not make the cut.

First we cleaned them as carefully as we could. Then we unplugged everything in the house we could get away with, carefully warmed up the system, Talisman’d it, found the right VTA for our Triplanar arm (by ear of course) and proceeded to spend the next hour or so playing copy after copy on side one, after which we repeated the process for side two.

If you have five or ten copies of a record and play them over and over against each other, the process itself teaches you what’s right and what’s wrong with the sound of the album. Using a few specific passages of music, once your ears are completely tuned to what the best pressings do well that the others do not do as well, it will soon become obvious how well any given pressing reproduces those passages.

The process could not be more simple. First you go deep into the sound. There you find something special, something you can’t find on most copies. Now, with the hard-won knowledge of precisely what to listen for, you are perfectly positioned to critique any and all pressings that come your way.

What We’re Listening For on Anything Goes

  • Energy for starters. What could be more important than the life of the music?
  • The Big Sound comes next — wall to wall, lots of depth, huge space, three-dimensionality, all that sort of thing.
  • Then transient information — fast, clear, sharp attacks, not the smear and thickness so common to these LPs.
  • Tight punchy bass — which ties in with good transient information, also the issue of frequency extension further down.
  • Next: transparency — the quality that allows you to hear deep into the soundfield, showing you the space and air around all the instruments.
  • Extend the top and bottom and voila, you have The Real Thing — an honest to goodness Hot Stamper.

TRACK LISTING

Side One

Anything Goes
Love For Sale
Night And Day
What Is This Thing Called Love

Side Two

I Get A Kick Out Of You
Just One Of Those Things
You’re The Top
All Through The Night

AMG  Review

The Quartet performs eight of Cole Porter’s most famous songs on this enjoyable outing. Few surprises occur but the music often swings hard, pianist Brubeck and altoist Paul Desmond take several excellent solos and bassist Eugene Wright and drummer Joe Morello really push the group.

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