Van Halen – 5150

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  • Sammy Hagar’s Van Halen debut finally arrives on the site with outstanding Double Plus (A++) sound from first note to last – exceptionally quiet vinyl too
  • Clean and clear and open are nice qualities to have, but lively and full are harder to come by on this record – this pressing has it all 
  • “Van Hagar” hit the ground running with this new incarnation, including “Why Can’t This Be Love,” “Love Walks In” and “Dreams”
  • 4 stars: “… on 5150… they had the songs and the desire to party, so those good intentions and slow tunes don’t slow the album down; they give it variety and help make the album a pretty impressive opening act for Van Halen Mach II.”

This WB pressing has the kind of Tubey Magical Midrange that modern records rarely even BEGIN to reproduce. Folks, that sound is gone and it sure isn’t showing signs of coming back. If you love hearing INTO a recording, actually being able to “see” the performers, and feeling as if you are sitting in the studio with Sammy and the band, this is the record for you. It’s what vintage all analog recordings are known for — this sound.

If you exclusively play modern repressings of vintage recordings, I can say without fear of contradiction that you have never heard this kind of sound on vinyl. Old records have it — not often, and certainly not always — but maybe one out of a hundred new records do, and those are some pretty long odds.

What the best sides of 5150 have to offer is not hard to hear:

  • The biggest, most immediate staging in the largest acoustic space
  • The most Tubey Magic, without which you have almost nothing. CDs give you clean and clear. Only the best vintage vinyl pressings offer the kind of Tubey Magic that was on the tapes in 1986
  • Tight, note-like, rich, full-bodied bass, with the correct amount of weight down low
  • Natural tonality in the midrange — with all the instruments having the correct timbre
  • Transparency and resolution, critical to hearing into the three-dimensional space of the studio

No doubt there’s more but we hope that should do for now. Playing the record is the only way to hear all of the above.

Engineering

Credit DONN LANDEE with the rich, smooth, oh-so-analog sound of the best copies. He’s recorded many of our favorite albums here at Better Records (and co-produced this one as well).

Most of the better Doobies Brothers albums are his, including: numerous Van Halen titles of course; Lowell George’s wonderful Thanks I’ll Eat It Here; Little Feat’s Time Loves a Hero (not their best music but some of their best sound); Carly Simon’s Another Passenger (my favorite of all her albums); and his Masterpiece (in my humble opinion), Captain Beefheart’s mindblowing Clear Spot.

What We’re Listening For on 5150

  • Energy for starters. What could be more important than the life of the music?
  • The Big Sound comes next — wall to wall, lots of depth, huge space, three-dimensionality, all that sort of thing.
  • Then transient information — fast, clear, sharp attacks, not the smear and thickness common to most LPs.
  • Tight, note-like bass with clear fingering — which ties in with good transient information, as well as the issue of frequency extension further down.
  • Next: transparency — the quality that allows you to hear deep into the soundfield, showing you the space and air around all the players.
  • Then: presence and immediacy. The musicians aren’t “back there” somewhere, way behind the speakers. They’re front and center where any recording engineer worth his salt — Don Landee in the case — would have put them.
  • Extend the top and bottom and voila, you have The Real Thing — an honest to goodness Hot Stamper.

TRACK LISTING

Side One

Good Enough
Why Can’t This Be Love
Get Up
Dreams
Summer Nights

Side Two

Best of Both Worlds
Love Walks In
5150
Inside

AMG 4 Star Review

The power struggle within Van Halen was often painted as David Lee Roth’s ego running out of control — a theory that was easy enough to believe given his outsized charisma — but in retrospect, it seems evident that Eddie Van Halen wanted respect to go along with his gargantuan fame, and Roth wasn’t willing to play.

Bizarrely enough, Sammy Hagar — the former Montrose lead singer who had carved out a successful solo career — was ready to play, possibly because the Red Rocker was never afraid of being earnest, nor was he afraid of synthesizers, for that matter. There was always the lingering suspicion that, yes, Sammy truly couldn’t drive 55, and that’s why he wrote the song, and that kind of forthright rocking is evident on the strident anthems of 5150. From the moment the album opens with the crashing “Good Enough,” it’s clearly the work of the same band — it’s hard to mistake Eddie’s guitars, just as it’s hard to mistake Alex and Michael Anthony’s pulse, or Michael’s harmonies — but the music feels decidedly different.

Where Diamond Dave would have strutted through the song with his tongue firmly in cheek, Hagar plays it right down the middle, never winking, never joking. Even when he takes a stab at humor on the closing “Inside” — joshing around about why the guys chose him as a replacement — it never feels funny, probably because, unlike Dave, he’s not a born comedian. Then again, 5150 wasn’t really intended to be funny; it was intended to be a serious album, spiked by a few relentless metallic rockers like “Get Up,” but functioning more as a vehicle to showcase Van Halen’s — particularly the guitarist’s — increasing growth and maturity.

There are plenty of power ballads, in “Why Can’t This Be Love” and “Love Walks In,” there’s a soaring anthem of inspiration in “Dreams,” and even the straight-up rocker “Best of Both Worlds” is tighter and leaner than the gonzo excursions of “Panama” and “Hot for Teacher.” And that’s where Hagar comes in: Diamond Dave didn’t have much patience for plainspoken lyrics or crafting songs, but Sammy does and he brings a previously unheard sense of discipline to the writing on 5150. Not that Hagar is a craftsman like Randy Newman, but he’s helped push Van Halen into a dedication on writing full-fledged songs, something that often seemed an afterthought in the original lineup. And so Van Hagar was a bit of an odd mix — a party band and a party guy, slowly veering into a bourgeois concept of respectability, something that eventually sunk the band — but on 5150 it worked because they had the songs and the desire to party, so those good intentions and slow tunes don’t slow the album down; they give it variety and help make the album a pretty impressive opening act for Van Halen Mach II

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