Son Seals – The Son Seals Blues Band

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  • An excellent Electric Blues record with exceptionally big, clear, lively sound that earned Double Plus (A++) grades on both sides – exceptionally quiet vinyl too
  • This copy will shame most Blues albums for sound and music – it’s quite a bit better than any other Son Seals album we have played as well 
  • 4 stars: “The Chicago mainstay’s debut album was a rough, gruff, no-nonsense affair typified by the decidedly unsentimental track “Your Love Is like a Cancer.” Seals wasn’t all that far removed from his southern roots at this point, and his slashing guitar work sports a strikingly raw feel on his originals “Look Now, Baby,” “Cotton Picking Blues,” and “Hot Sauce” (the latter a blistering instrumental that sounds a bit like the theme from Batman played sideways).”

This 1973 debut album has the kind of Live-in-the-Studio sound that most Blues albums (and every other kind of album) strive for but practically never achieve. If you turn this one up good and loud, the Son Seals Band will be right there in the room with you. If there’s any overdubbing on this record you sure can’t hear it.

If you’ve been suffering with one bad sounding Stevie Ray Vaughan album after another — is there any other kind? — this record should come as a godsend. This album will show you just how dynamic and energetic recordings can be, but so rarely are.

You can’t see this guy live anymore, he’s dead, RIP, but you can still hear him perform live in your listening room if you have a killer system and a Hot Stamper copy of this album — as often as you want, too. Play this one for all your friends who love Stevie Ray. Son Seals has the chops to go head to head with him, with recording quality that’s night and day better than Stevie’s in every way. Your friends’ minds will surely be blown (and if they aren’t, turn up the volume a click or two and try again. Live music is loud).

What do the best Hot Stamper pressings give you?

  • Energy for starters. What could be more important than the life of the music?
  • The Big Sound comes next — wall to wall, lots of depth, huge space, three-dimensionality, all that sort of thing.
  • Then transient information — fast, clear, sharp attacks for the guitar notes, not the smear and thickness so common to most LPs.
  • Tight punchy bass — which ties in with good transient information, also the issue of frequency extension further down.
  • Next: transparency — the quality that allows you to hear deep into the soundfield, showing you the space and air around all the instruments.
  • Then: presence and immediacy. The guitar isn’t back there somewhere, lost in the mix. It’s front and center where any recording engineer worth his salt would put it.
  • Extend the top and bottom and voila, you have The Real Thing — an honest to goodness Hot Stamper.

TRACK LISTING

Side One

Mother-in-Law Blues
Sitting at My Window
Look Now, Baby
Your Love Is Like a Cancer
All Your Love

Side Two

Cotton Picking Blues
Hot Sauce (Inst.)
How Could She Leave Me
Going Home Tomorrow
Now That I’m Down

AMG  Review

The Chicago mainstay’s debut album was a rough, gruff, no-nonsense affair typified by the decidedly unsentimental track “Your Love Is like a Cancer.” Seals wasn’t all that far removed from his southern roots at this point, and his slashing guitar work sports a strikingly raw feel on his originals “Look Now, Baby,” “Cotton Picking Blues,” and “Hot Sauce” (the latter a blistering instrumental that sounds a bit like the theme from Batman played sideways).