Paul McCartney and Wings – Ram

More Paul McCartney

Ram

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  • This vintage pressing of McCartney’s 1971 Classic boasts outstanding Double Plus (A++) sound and exceptionally quiet vinyl on both sides
  • A copy like this is a real audiophile treat – here is the rich, warm, clear, natural and lively sound you want for Ram   
  • Many of the man’s most memorable songs are here: Too Many People, Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey, Monkberry Moon Delight, Heart Of The Country and more
  • 5 stars: “These songs may not be self-styled major statements, but they are endearing and enduring, as is Ram itself, which seems like a more unique, exquisite pleasure with each passing year.”

I remember this album being dismissed as lightweight back in the day and I may have even felt the same to be honest. Heck, compared to Abbey Road and The White Album, the very same thing could be said about most of McCartney’s albums.

McCartney isn’t out to blow you away with high-production value rock here, apart from Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey. He’s making some lovely pop music with his wife and sharing it with the world. And what’s so wrong with that?

The Five Star All Music Guide review by Stephen Thomas Erlewine (the best writer at AMG for our money) nails it, and we recommend you click on the AMG Review tab above to give it the once over.

Both sides are unusually natural, with little to none of the edgy, grainy top end that plagues the typical pressing of Ram. It’s a rare copy that manages to combine this sort of correct tonality with good energy and punchiness. In fact this one strikes that balance wonderfully well, hence the very high grades.

What the best sides of this Classic McCartney Album have to offer is not hard to hear:

  • The biggest, most immediate staging in the largest acoustic space
  • The most Tubey Magic, without which you have almost nothing. CDs give you clean and clear. Only the best vintage vinyl pressings offer the kind of Tubey Magic that was on the tapes in 1971
  • Tight, note-like, rich, full-bodied bass, with the correct amount of weight down low
  • Natural tonality in the midrange — with all the instruments having the correct timbre
  • Transparency and resolution, critical to hearing into the three-dimensional studio space

No doubt there’s more but we hope that should do for now. Playing the record is the only way to hear all of the qualities we discuss above, and playing the best pressings against a pile of other copies under rigorously controlled conditions is the only way to find a pressing that sounds as good as this one does.

Country Of Origin

Some record collecting audiophiles seek out pressings that were produced in the country where the artist is from, or in some cases, the country where the music was recorded. Many times, that’s a good way to go, but it is not a hard and fast rule that guarantees you a good pressing.

There are actually great Brit pressings for Ram and great domestic pressings, but there are a heckuva lot more terrible to mediocre sounding versions from both countries.

What We’re Listening For on Ram

  • Energy for starters. What could be more important than the life of the music?
  • Then: presence and immediacy. The vocals aren’t “back there” somewhere, lost in the mix. They’re front and center where any recording engineer worth his salt would put them.
  • The Big Sound comes next — wall to wall, lots of depth, huge space, three-dimensionality, all that sort of thing.
  • Then transient information — fast, clear, sharp attacks, not the smear and thickness so common to these LPs.
  • Tight punchy bass — which ties in with good transient information, also the issue of frequency extension further down.
  • Next: transparency — the quality that allows you to hear deep into the soundfield, showing you the space and air around all the instruments.
  • Extend the top and bottom and voila, you have The Real Thing — an honest to goodness Hot Stamper.

TRACK LISTING

Side One

Too Many People 
3 Legs 
Ram On 
Dear Boy 
Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey 
Smile Away

Side Two

Heart Of The Country 
Monkberry Moon Delight 
Eat At Home 
Long Haired Lady 
Ram On 
The Back Seat Of My Car

AMG 5 Star Review

After the breakup, Beatles fans expected major statements from the three chief songwriters in the Fab Four. John and George fulfilled those expectations — Lennon with his lacerating, confessional John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band, Harrison with his triple-LP All Things Must Pass — but Paul McCartney certainly didn’t, turning toward the modest charms of McCartney, and then crediting his wife Linda as a full-fledged collaborator on its 1971 follow-up, Ram.

Where McCartney was homemade, sounding deliberately ragged in parts, Ram had a fuller production yet retained that ramshackle feel, sounding as if it were recorded in a shack out back, not far from the farm where the cover photo of Paul holding the ram by the horns was taken. It’s filled with songs that feel tossed off, filled with songs that are cheerfully, incessantly melodic; it turns the monumental symphonic sweep of Abbey Road into a cheeky slice of whimsy on the two-part suite “Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey.”

All this made Ram an object of scorn and derision upon its release (and for years afterward, in fact), but in retrospect it looks like nothing so much as the first indie pop album, a record that celebrates small pleasures with big melodies, a record that’s guileless and unembarrassed to be cutesy.

But McCartney never was quite the sap of his reputation, and even here, on possibly his most precious record, there’s some ripping rock & roll in the mock-apocalyptic goof “Monkberry Moon Delight,” the joyfully noisy “Smile Away,” where his feet can be smelled a mile away, and “Eat at Home,” a rollicking, winking sex song.

All three of these are songs filled with good humor, and their foundation in old-time rock & roll makes it easy to overlook how inventive these productions are, but on the more obviously tuneful and gentle numbers — the ones that are more quintessentially McCartney-esque — it’s plain to see how imaginative and gorgeous the arrangements are, especially on the sad, soaring finale, “Back Seat of My Car,” but even on its humble opposite, the sweet “Heart of the Country.”

These songs may not be self-styled major statements, but they are endearing and enduring, as is Ram itself, which seems like a more unique, exquisite pleasure with each passing year.