Eno – Here Come The Warm Jets – Our Shootout Winning Copy from 2007

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This British Island Sunray LP is the copy we’ve been waiting for! We love this music but we’d never heard a copy of this album that could hold its own sonically with our Hot Stamper copies of Taking Tiger Mountain — until we played this one.

We hardly ever see enough clean copies of this to do a full shootout, but we know Hot Stamper sound when we hear it and this copy’s got it — on BOTH sides. It’s got a wonderfully meaty bottom end that was missing from many of the copies we’ve played before. Baby’s On Fire is super punchy, and Cindy Tells Me has AMAZING bass. The vocals are full-bodied and breathy with lots of texture and wonderful presence. The clarity here is superb — none of the smearing so common to the domestic pressings.

Dead Finks Don’t Talk on side two is probably the best sounding song here — it’s OUT OF THIS WORLD! 

We hardly ever see enough clean copies of this to do a full shootout, but we know Hot Stamper sound when we hear it and this copy’s got it — on BOTH sides. It’s got a wonderfully meaty bottom end that was missing from many of the copies we’ve played before. Baby’s On Fire is super punchy, and Cindy Tells Me has AMAZING bass. The vocals are full-bodied and breathy with lots of texture and wonderful presence. The clarity here is superb — none of the smearing so common to the domestic pressings. Dead Finks Don’t Talk on side two is probably the best sounding song here — it’s OUT OF THIS WORLD!

This is not your typical audiophile-friendly rock album, to be sure. There are lots of weird sounds, out-of-tune instruments and other Eno craziness. We’re big Eno fans here — Taking Tiger Mountain and Before And After Science are other big favorites here. If you’ve got a taste for avant-garde art rock, this album should be right up your alley.

The vinyl plays exceptionally quietly for an old Sunray — mostly Mint Minus throughout.

TRACK LISTING

Side One

Needles In The Camel’s Eye
The Paw Paw Negro Blowtorch
Baby’s On Fire
Cindy Tells Me
Driving Me Backwards

Side Two

On Some Faraway Beach
Blank Frank
Dead Finks Don’t Talk
Some Of Them Are Old
Here Come The Warm Jets

AMG 4 1/2 Star Rave Review

Eno’s solo debut, Here Come the Warm Jets, is a spirited, experimental collection of unabashed pop songs on which Eno mostly reprises his Roxy Music role as “sound manipulator,” taking the lead vocals but leaving much of the instrumental work to various studio cohorts (including ex-Roxy mates Phil Manzanera and Andy Mackay, plus Robert Fripp and others). Eno’s compositions are quirky, whimsical, and catchy, his lyrics bizarre and often free-associative, with a decidedly dark bent in their humor (“Baby’s on Fire,” “Dead Finks Don’t Talk”).

Yet the album wouldn’t sound nearly as manic as it does without Eno’s wildly unpredictable sound processing; he coaxes otherworldly noises and textures from the treated guitars and keyboards, layering them in complex arrangements or bouncing them off one another in a weird cacophony. Avant-garde yet very accessible, Here Come the Warm Jets still sounds exciting, forward-looking, and densely detailed, revealing more intricacies with every play.