Pat Metheny – Offramp

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A distinguished member of the Better Records Jazz Hall of Fame.

Triple Plus on side two, it’s the side with the most space, all the weight, and the best balance of them all. Side one is Double Plus, doing pretty much everything side two was doing – in short, getting this ethereal music to sound right. Offramp held the Number One spot on the Jazz Album charts for 16 weeks back in 1982.

This WHITE HOT Stamper side two of Metheny’s ECM Chart Topping release from 1982 shows you just how well recorded the album is.

We don’t know how you feel about ECM recordings in general but we tend to think they are pretty lifeless and boring. Not so here!

This is the sound of the Master Tape — worlds better than what most record lovers have ever had the privilege of hearing. If you want to know how good this album can sound, it’s first come, first served. There’s only one, folks, and this is it.

We guarantee this copy has more CLARITY, ENERGY and DYNAMICS than any pressing of the album you have ever heard. Where is the muck? The blurry bottom end? The smear? All gone. And the bass is monstrous. 

If you’re a fan of this 4 1/2 Star album, this copy will show you what you’ve surely been missing all these years — the kind of sound that lets this music breathe.

TRACK LISTING

Side One

Barcarole 
Are You Going With Me? 
Au Lait

Side Two

Eighteen 
Offramp 
James 
The Bat Part II

AMG Review

As cerebral as Metheny gets on such atmospheric pieces as “Are You Going with Me?” and “Au Lait,” his playing remains decidedly lyrical and melodic.

Clearly influenced by Jim Hall, the thoughtful Metheny makes excellent use of space, choosing his notes wisely and reminding listeners that, while he has heavy-duty chops, he’s not one to beat everybody over the head with them. Even when he picks up the tempo for the difficult and angular title song, he shuns empty musical acrobatics.

Throughout, Metheny enjoys a powerful rapport with keyboardist Lyle Mays, who also avoids exploiting his technique and opts for meaningful storytelling.

Pat Metheny Group

Despite the common description of Metheny’s music as “fusion,” it was always his intention to create improvised music that had a greater emphasis on bringing out harmony than anything common to what was called “fusion” of the time.

Pastorius, with whom Metheny struck up a friendship while the two attended the University of Miami and later toured in Joni Mitchell’s backing band during her transition from her earlier folk rock compositions to those with more jazz influence, had at the same time explored melodic lines for his instrument within the melodies normally heard, rather than just providing a simple bassline, revolutionizing the way the bass guitar was viewed by the musical establishment. The two friends would talk into the late evening during the early 1970s and discuss the new possibilities their instruments held.

At the same time, Jaco and I were both really on a mission to find a way to play and find a way to present our instruments in an improvisational environment that expressed our dissatisfaction with the status quo at the time.

In 1977, bassist Mark Egan joined Metheny, Mays, and Gottlieb to form the Pat Metheny Group. They released the self-titled album “Pat Metheny Group” in 1978 on the ECM label, which featured several songs co-written by Metheny and Mays. The group’s second album, American Garage (1979), was a breakout hit, reaching #1 on the Billboard Jazz chart and crossing over to the pop charts as well, largely on the strength of the up-tempo opening track “(Cross the) Heartland” which would become a signature tune for the group. The group built upon its success with lengthy tours in the USA and Europe.

The group featured a unique sound, particularly due to Metheny’s Gibson ES-175 guitar coupled to two digital delay units and Mays’ Oberheim synthesizer and Yamaha Organ. The group played in a wide range of styles from experimental to grassroots music. Later on, Metheny began working with the Roland GR300 guitar synthesizer and a Synclavier System, while Mays expanded his setup with a Prophet 5 synthesizer designed by Sequential Circuits, and later with many other synthesizers.