Neil Young – Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere

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More Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere

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  • A MONSTER Shootout Winning early pressing with incredible Triple Plus (A+++) sound on both sides – this is the EKTIN you have been waiting for!
  • Live-in-Your-Listening-Room sound throughout – miles beyond any copy you’ve heard (or ever will hear)
  • Includes immortal classics such as “Cinnamon Girl,” “Cowgirl in the Sand,” and “Down by the River,” just to name three
  • 5 stars: “Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere was breathtakingly different when it appeared in May 1969, both for Young and for rock in general… almost 30 years later [make that 49], he was still playing this sort of music with Crazy Horse, and a lot of contemporary bands were playing music clearly influenced by it.”

The sound of this Hot Stamper copy is Big and Bold in the best Neil Young tradition, with studio ambience bouncing off the walls and into the open mics he favors.

The best tracks have that Live-in-the-Studio quality, with minimal processing and maximum ENERGY. We absolutely love that sound. With a killer pressing played back on a big pair of speakers this album can ROCK like nobody’s business. Nine minutes of Down by the River? A ten minute long version of Cowgirl in the Sand? Cinnamon Girl? We are so there.

Most of the pressings we audition are ruined by too much grit, grain, and spit, but here you will find no such problems. This kind of musical, natural sound is not easy to come by on Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere. If you own any copy of the album you know exactly what we are talking about.

What the best sides of this Neil Young’s Breatkthrough from 1969 have to offer is not hard to hear:

  • The biggest, most immediate staging in the largest acoustic space
  • The most Tubey Magic, without which you have almost nothing. CDs give you clean and clear. Only the best vintage vinyl domestic pressings like this one offer the kind of Tubey Magic that was on the tapes in 1969
  • Tight, note-like, rich, full-bodied bass, with the correct amount of weight down low
  • Natural tonality in the midrange — with all the voices, guitars and drums having the correct sound for this kind of recording
  • Transparency and resolution, critical to hearing into the three-dimensional space of the studio

No doubt there’s more but we hope that should do for now

Playing the record is the only way to hear all of the above, and playing the best pressings against a pile of other copies under rigorously controlled conditions is the only way to find a pressing that sounds as good as this one does.

Not quite in the league with the best of the best, the likes of Gold Rush, Harvest or Zuma, the best sounding tracks — and that does not mean all of them by any means — are a rough guide to what was to come as Neil and his producer David Briggs got better and better, until they were As Good As It Gets by the time they got around to After the Gold Rush in 1970 (for which they seem to get no credit, outside of Better Records’ raves for the album of course).

Moving Product

Classic Rock is the heart and soul of our business. Finding quiet, good sounding pressings of Classic Rock albums is what we devote most of our resources to, and if we can be indulged a self-compliment, it’s what we do best.

No one is even bothering to attempt the kind of shootouts we immerse ourselves in all week long. And who can blame them? It’s hard to assemble the resources necessary to pull it off. There are a huge number of steps a record must go through before it finds itself on our site, which means there are about ten copies sitting in the backroom for every one that’s for sale.

If the goal is to move product this is a very bad way to go about it.

Then again, we don’t care about moving product. We care about selling good sounding records. Those two things have turned out to be very much at odds in our experience.

TRACK LISTING

Side One

Cinnamon Girl
Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere
Round & Round (It Won’t Be Long)
Down by the River

Side Two

Losing End (When You’re On)
Running Dry (Requiem for the Rockets) 
Cowgirl in the Sand

Pitchfork Rave from Wikipedia

Pitchfork wrote, “the opening riff to ‘Cinnamon Girl’ erases the memory of Neil Young completely in about five seconds” and that “Crazy Horse were loose and sloppy, privileging groove and feeling above all.” He also said that “Young sounds comfortable and confident, singing with the versatile voice that has changed remarkably little in the 40 years since” and concluded that it “was a sort of big bang for Young, a dense moment of creative explosion that saw possibilities expanding in every direction.”

AMG 5 Star Rave Review

Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere was breathtakingly different when it appeared in May 1969, both for Young and for rock in general, and it reversed his commercial fortunes, becoming a moderate hit. (Young’s joining Crosby, Stills & Nash the month after its release didn’t hurt his profile, of course.)

A year and a half after its release, it became a gold album, and it has since gone platinum. And it set a musical pattern Young and his many musical descendants have followed ever since; almost 30 years later, he was still playing this sort of music with Crazy Horse, and a lot of contemporary bands were playing music clearly influenced by it.


In 2003, the album was ranked number 208 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.