The Moody Blues – Every Good Boy Deserves Favour

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  • Superb Double Plus (A++) sound on both sides – this is one of the better sounding copies we played in our recent shootout
  • With a wonderful combination of Tubey Magical richness and clarity, this pressing will be very hard to beat
  • Full-bodied and lush, yet not veiled or distant, this is the sound that brings the Moodies magic to life
  • 4 1/2 stars: “The best-realized of their classic albums, Every Good Boy Deserves Favour was also the last of the group’s albums for almost a decade to be done under reasonably happy and satisfying circumstances — for the last time with this lineup, they went into the studio with a reasonably full song bag and a lot of ambition and brought both as far as time would allow…”

This copy had the BIG, RICH, LUSH British sound that can only be heard on the very best Moody Blues pressings.

Great-sounding Moody Blues albums don’t show up on our site too often — they’re just not that easy to come by. Dull, veiled, boring sound is the rule, and big, rich, CLEAR sound like this the exception.

That may explain why our last big shootout for the album occurred way back in 2014.

Smokin’ Psychedelic Sound

The soundfield is BIG, WIDE, and DEEP — exactly what you what for these big production songs with layers upon layers of musical ideas. When the various parts don’t have room to breathe, your copy is in TROUBLE.

The bass is deep and punchy, the vocals are full-bodied and breathy, and the amount of ambience around the instruments is exquisite. You’re going to have a hard, painful time trying to find better sound for this album than you’ll hear on these two sides.

Three Qualities to Listen For

Achieving just the right balance of Tubey Magical, rich but not too rich “Moody Blues Sound” is no mean feat. You had better be using the real master tape for starters. Then you need a pressing with actual extension at the top, a quality rarely found on most imports. Finally, good bass definition is essential; it keeps the bottom end from blurring the midrange. No domestic copy in our experience has ever had these three qualities, and only the best of the imports manages to combine all three on the same LP.

Every Moody Blues record is going to sound a bit murky and muddy; that’s obviously the kind of sound that these guys were going for. On anything but a Hot Stamper pressing, the result is going to be a fat, turgid, thick sounding record that is impossible to penetrate. When you find one like this, you can begin to understand what the band was going for, and the best moments are pure Moody Blues MAGIC.

No Sacrifice Necessary — You Can Have It All

With the best pressings all the clarity and resolution comes without sacrificing the Tubey Magical richness, warmth and lushness for which the Moody Blues recordings are justifiably famous. I’m not kidding — the best pressings present this music in a way that no previous LPs of it that we’ve ever played could. Some are so correct from top to bottom, so present and alive, while still retaining all the richness and sweetness we expect from British Moody Blues records, that I find it hard to believe you can do any better, in this life anyway. Some copies manage to take the Moodies’ wonderful music to another level. They are the very definition of a Hot Stamper.

TRACK LISTING

Side One

Procession
The Story In Your Eyes
Our Guessing Game
Emily’s Song
After You Came

Side Two

One More Time To Live
Nice To Be Here
You Can Never Go Home
My Song

AMG 4 1/2 Star Review

The best-realized of their classic albums, Every Good Boy Deserves Favour was also the last of the group’s albums for almost a decade to be done under reasonably happy and satisfying circumstances — for the last time with this lineup, they went into the studio with a reasonably full song bag and a lot of ambition and brought both as far as time would allow…

Sad to say, the group would never be this happy with an album again — at least not for a lot of years — or with their commitment to being a group, though they would leave one more highly worthwhile album before taking a hiatus for most of the rest of the 1970s.

Overview and Discography

Moody Blues records have a marked tendency to sound murky and muddy; that’s obviously the sound these five guys were going for because you hear it on every album they released.

Compound their sound with bad mastering, bad pressing or bad vinyl — not to mention vinyl that hasn’t been cleaned properly — and you may find yourself wading through an impassable sonic swamp. With anything but a Hot Stamper the result is going to be sound so thick and opaque that it will confound any attempt you might make to hear into it.

Only with the better Hot Stamper pressings can you begin to understand what this band achieved in the studio. The best pressings of their albums have the power to show you MOODY BLUES MAGIC that others only hint at. Oh, it’s there all right, and every bit as glorious as you’d hoped it would be.

The Revolutionary Changes in Audio of the last five or ten years have worked wonders for the sound of the Moody Blues’ albums. Old School Stereos will make their albums sound pretty much the way they always have — bloated, murky, compressed and just plain boring.

And those are the imports! The domestic copies, mastered from copy tapes, are smeary and full of transistory grain, a deadly combination. You’ll notice we never list domestic Moody Blues records on the site. What would be the point? They don’t sound good.

DISCOGRAPHY

Hot Stamper shootouts have been done for all their records with the exception of Go Now (which never sounds good as far as we know).

  • Go Now! (a.k.a. The Magnificent Moodies) (1965)
  • Days of Future Passed (1967)
  • In Search of the Lost Chord (1968)
  • On the Threshold of a Dream (1969)
  • To Our Children’s Children’s Children (1969)
  • A Question of Balance (1970)
  • Every Good Boy Deserves Favour (1971)
  • Seventh Sojourn (1972)