Ornette Coleman – Something Else!

More Ornette Coleman

More Something Else!

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  • Outstanding sound throughout; Triple Plus (A+++) on the second side and Double Plus (A++) on the first 
  • Both sides are big, full-bodied, clean and clear with lots of deep punchy bass and a nice extended top end
  • It’s not quite as ‘out there’ as some of his better known material, but those of you with a taste for adventurous jazz will still find much to love here
  • “… the most important thing about Something Else! was that, in its angular, almost totally oppositional way, it swung and still does; like a finger-poppin’ daddy on a Saturday night, this record swings from the rafters of the human heart with the most unusually gifted, emotional, and lyrical line since Bill Evans first hit the scene.” – All Music, 4 1/2 Stars

For us audiophiles the sound is shockingly good. If you’re looking to demonstrate just how good 1958 All Tube Analog sound can be, this killer copy will do the trick.

This pressing is super spacious, sweet and positively dripping with ambience. Talk about Tubey Magic, the liquidity of the sound here is positively uncanny. This is vintage analog at its best, so full-bodied and relaxed you’ll wonder how it ever came to be that anyone seriously contemplated trying to improve it.

This IS the sound of Tubey Magic. No recordings will ever be made like this again, and no CD will ever capture what is in the grooves of this record. Of course there is a CD of this album, but those of us in possession of a working turntable and a good collection of vintage vinyl could care less.

What do the better Hot Stamper pressings like this one give you?

  • Energy for starters. What could be more important than the life of the music?
  • The Big Sound comes next — wall to wall, lots of depth, huge space, three-dimensionality, all that sort of thing.
  • Then transient information — fast, clear, sharp attacks for the horns and drums, not the smear and thickness so common to most LPs.
  • Tight, note-like bass with clear fingering — which ties in with good transient information, as well as the issue of frequency extension further down.
  • Next: transparency — the quality that allows you to hear deep into the soundfield, showing you the space and air around all the players.
  • Then: presence and immediacy. The musicians aren’t “back there” somewhere, way behind the speakers. They’re front and center where any recording engineer worth his salt — Roy DuNann in this case — would have put them.
  • Extend the top and bottom and voila, you have The Real Thing — an honest to goodness Hot Stamper.

No doubt there’s more but we hope that should do for now. Playing the record is the only way to hear all of the above, and playing the best pressings against a pile of other copies under rigorously controlled conditions is the only way to find a pressing that sounds as good as this one does.

TRACK LISTING

Side One

Invisible
The Blessing
Jayne
Chippie

Side Two

The Disguise
Angel Voice
Alpha
When Will The Blues Leave?
The Sphinx

AMG 4 1/2 Star Review

This 1958 debut recording by the Ornette Coleman Quintet, which featured Coleman on his trademark white plastic alto, Don Cherry on trumpet, Billy Higgins on drums, Walter Norris on piano, and Don Payne on bass, shook up the jazz world — particularly those musicians and critics who had entered the hard bop era with such verve and were busy using the blues as a way of creating vast solo spaces inside tight and short melody lines. Something Else!!!! is anathema to that entire idea, and must have sounded like it came from outer space at the time. First, Coleman’s interest was in pitch, not “being in tune.” His use of pitch could take him all over — and outside of — a composition, as it does on “Invisible,” which begins in D flat. The intervals are standard, but the melodic component of the tune — despite its hard bop tempo — is, for the most part, free.

But what is most compelling is evident in abundance here and on the next two tunes, “The Blessing” and “Jayne”: a revitalization of the blues as it expressed itself in jazz. Coleman refurbished the blues framework, threaded it through his jazz without getting rid of its folk-like, simplistic milieu. In other words, the groove Coleman was getting here was a people’s groove that only confounded intellectuals at the time. Coleman restored blues to their “classic” beginnings in African music and unhooked their harmonies. Whether the key was D flat, A, G, whatever, Coleman revisited the 17- and 25-bar blues. There are normal signatures, however, such as “Chippie” in F and in eight-bar form, and “The Disguise” is in D, but in a strange 13-bar form where the first and the last change places, altering the talking-like voice inherent in the melodic line.

But the most important thing about Something Else! was that, in its angular, almost totally oppositional way, it swung and still does; like a finger-poppin’ daddy on a Saturday night, this record swings from the rafters of the human heart with the most unusually gifted, emotional, and lyrical line since Bill Evans first hit the scene.