Supertramp – Crime of the Century on MoFi – What to Listen For

More Supertramp

More Crime of the Century on MoFi

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Another in our series of Home Audio Exercises with specific advice on What to Listen For (WTLF) as you critically evaluate your MoFi copy of COTC.

Listen to the vocals at the end of Dreamer. If they are bright, the bells at the end of the song sound super-extended and harmonically rich. But at what price? The vocals are TOO BRIGHT. Which is more important, good vocals or good bells? There has to be a balance. This is something audiophiles and audiophile labels, who should obviously know better, often have trouble understanding.

We get these MoFis in on a regular basis, and they usually sound as phony and wrong as can be. They’re the perfect example of a hyped-up audiophile record that appeals to people with lifeless stereos, the kind that need amped-up records to get them going.

I’ve been telling people for years that the MoFi was junk, and that they should get rid of their copy and replace it with a tonally correct version, easily done since there is a very good sounding Speakers Corner 180g reissue currently in print which does not suffer from the ridiculously boosted top end and bloated bass that characterizes the typical MoFi COTC pressing.

As I have previously written about this album, it is one of the most incredible musical and sonic journeys your audio system can take you on. It’s also a desert island disc for me. In my opinion it’s the Most Successful Concept Album of all time. Dark Side of the Moon or The Yes Album are two other productions that rise to this level, and as much as I love those albums, I actually think this one is the best of the three, if for no other reason than that the tragedy of the story here is more emotionally compelling.

This is also an audiophile’s dream come true. The creation of a huge Cinerama-like soundscape is on a scale that few recording engineers would ever even attempt, let alone achieve with such success. 



Further Reading

…along these lines can be found below.

Here are more records that will help you avoid listening for phony detail when evaluating equipment or tweaking your system.

he most important advice on the site can be found under the heading Hot Stamper Shootouts — The Four Pillars of Success.

Record shootouts are the fastest and easiest way to hone your listening skills, a subject we discuss often on the site and directly address in this commentary from way back in 2005.

Here are more entries in our ongoing Shootout Advice series.