David Bowie – Station To Station

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  • This Bowie Art Rock Classic from 1976 boasts excellent Double Plus (A++) sound and reasonably quiet vinyl on both sides
  • This is a dense, difficult recording to get to sound right, which means you really need Hot Stampers on Station to Station to enjoy it
  • Superb presence and energy – the title cut and Golden Years sound wonderful here, as does the classic, radio-friendly TVC 15
  • 4 1/2 stars: “… its epic structure and clinical sound were an impressive, individualistic achievement, as well as a style that would prove enormously influential on post-punk.”

Full, punchy and present with a wide open soundstage and powerful dynamics, this is the right sound for this album, and the kind of sound that is not easy to find.

What do the best Hot Stamper pressings give you?

  • Energy for starters. What could be more important than the life of the music?
  • Then: presence and immediacy. The vocals aren’t “back there” somewhere, lost in the mix. They’re front and center where any recording engineer worth his salt would put them.
  • The Big Sound comes next — wall to wall, lots of depth, huge space, three-dimensionality, all that sort of thing.
  • Then transient information — fast, clear, sharp attacks, not the smear and thickness so common to these LPs.
  • Tight punchy bass — which ties in with good transient information, also the issue of frequency extension further down.
  • Next: transparency — the quality that allows you to hear deep into the soundfield, showing you the space and air around all the instruments.
  • Extend the top and bottom and voila, you have The Real Thing — an honest to goodness Hot Stamper.

What to Listen For (WTLF)

Less grit – smoother and sweeter sound, something that is not easy to come by on Station to Station.

A bigger presentation – more size, more space, more room for all the instruments and voices to occupy. The bigger the speakers you have to play this record the better.

More bass and tighter bass. This is fundamentally a rock record. It needs weight down low to rock the way the artists, engineers and producers wanted it to.

Present, breathy vocals. A veiled midrange is the rule, not the exception.

Good top end extension to reproduce the harmonics of the instruments and details of the recording including the studio ambience.

Last but not least, balance. All the elements from top to bottom should be heard in harmony with each other. Take our word for it, assuming you haven’t played a pile of these yourself, balance is not that easy to find.

Our best copies will have it though, of that there is no doubt.

Best Practices

If you have five or ten copies of a record and play them over and over against each other, the process itself teaches you what’s right and what’s wrong with the sound of the album. Once your ears are completely tuned to what the best pressings do well that the others do not do as well, using a few specific passages of music, it will quickly become obvious how well any given pressing reproduces those passages.

The process is simple enough. First you go deep into the sound. There you find something special, something you can’t find on most copies. Now, with the hard-won knowledge of precisely what to listen for, you are perfectly positioned to critique any and all pressings that come your way.

TRACK LISTING

Side One

Station To Station
Golden Years
Word On A Wing

Side Two

TVC 15
Stay
Wild Is The Wind

AMG 4 1/2 Star Rave Review

At its heart, Station to Station is an avant-garde art-rock album, most explicitly on “TVC 15” and the epic sprawl of the title track, but also on the cool crooning of “Wild Is the Wind” and “Word on a Wing,” as well as the disco stylings of “Golden Years”… its epic structure and clinical sound were an impressive, individualistic achievement, as well as a style that would prove enormously influential on post-punk.