Freddie Hubbard – Red Clay

Some sections on our site are hard to find. Here’s one with lots of cool records in it:

Forgotten Jazz Classics

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Freddie Hubbard – Red Clay

A distinguished member of the Better Records Jazz Hall of Fame.

This original CTI pressing has two wonderful sides, including an AMAZING A+++ SIDE TWO! This side two has amazingly good Demo Disc sound. RVG knocked this one out of the park, that’s for damn sure.

Hubbard was a master of funky jazz, and the song Red Clay is possibly the funkiest jazz track he ever got down on tape. At 12 minutes in length it is a transcendentally powerful experience — and the bigger your speakers and the louder you turn them up the more moving that experience is going to be!

More Freddie Hubbard

Side One

Side one gets going with the perennial favorite, Red Clay. The intro starts off with a stylized free-form jam, sounding like a bop-jazz band of old, then takes form and solidifies into a groove of monstrous proportions. Ron Carter’s bass playing is stellar and that fingers-on-frets sound is heard on this copy. Super clear and present, this side has zero smear and amazingly explosive transients! A touch more top and this would be right there with side two.

Like many of our funky favorites, this one was eventually sampled for a popular hip-hop song. That may not mean much to you, but it definitely means that nice copies of this album get swiped up quickly by young DJs and producers.

Side Two

Listen to the big rich keyboards on this side — that’s the sound of ANALOG, baby! And this side has absolutely the best drums we heard in our shootout — and the best horns, and bass, etc. In short, this is As Good As It Gets (AGAIG)! Super lively and clear with a big room around all the instruments, if you’re into this kind of funky soul jazz you can’t go wrong here.

RVG Is The Man

The really good RVG pressings sound shockingly close to live music — uncompressed, present, full of energy, with the instruments clearly located and surrounded by the natural space of the studio. As the stereo has gotten better, and we’ve found better pressings and learned how to clean them better, his “you-are-there” live jazz sound has come to impress us more and more.

The early ’70s were a good time for Van Gelder. This album is from 1970, All the King’s Men from 1973, and both are amazing Demo Discs in their own right, one for quintet, one for large group. But only on the right pressings, another fact that may ahve eluded most jazz vinyl aficionados but is settled science to those of us who’ve heard Hot Stampers.