Great in Stereo, Bad in Mono. What Else Is New?

More of The In Crowd

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Skip the Mono

This album is more common in mono than stereo, but we found the sound of the mono pressing we played unsatisfying. Where is the wall to wall space of the live club? It has been drastically shrunken into the area between the speakers. Much of the ambience disappeared with it, destroying the illusion the album was trying to create, that you are there.

In mono, you really aren’t.

Here are some other records that we don’t think sound very good in MONO.

Here are some we think can sound amazing in MONO.

OUR HOT STEREO COPY

  • An excellent copy with both sides rating a Double Plus (A++) or better
  • It’s taken us years, but Lewis’s breakout bestselling album The In Crowd finally makes its debut at Better Records
  • If you want to know what jazz at an intimate nightclub would have sounded like in 1965, play this record – this is that sound
  • AMG raves “…this is the moment where Lewis shined the brightest, the “in crowd” at the club was verbally into it, and the time for this music was right.”

 

See all of our Ramsey Lewis Trio albums in stock

This original Argo Blue Label Stereo pressing has the kind of Tubey Magical Midrange that modern records cannot even BEGIN to reproduce. Folks, that sound is gone and it sure isn’t showing signs of coming back. If you love hearing INTO a recording, actually being able to “see” the performers, and feeling as if you are sitting in a real jazz club, this is the record for you. It’s what Vintage Records are known for — this sound.

If you exclusively play modern repressings of vintage recordings, I can say without fear of contradiction that you have never heard this kind of sound on vinyl. Old records have it — not often, and certainly not always — but maybe one out of a hundred new records do, and those are some pretty long odds.

What is lost in these newly remastered recordings? Lots of things, but the most obvious and bothersome is TRANSPARENCY. And the loss of transparency in a live jazz club recording is practically the kiss of death.